Mar 22, 2016 12:56 AM

The Latest: Kerry meets with Colombia peace negotiators

The Associated Press

HAVANA (AP) The Latest on President Barack Obama's trip to Cuba (all times local):

8:30 p.m.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry has met with representatives on both sides of Colombian peace talks in the Cuban capital.

A photo released by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, shows Kerry with guerrilla leaders including the top commander, Rodrigo Londono, who goes by the nom de guerre Timochenko.

The FARC says in an open letter that it asked for Washington to consider it "a trustworthy partner in the building of a continental peace" and recognize it as a political organization. The FARC is designated as a terrorist group by Washington.

Humberto de la Calle, the chief negotiator for the Colombian government, says the encounter with Kerry was "very productive."

Talks have been going on in Havana since late 2012. Kerry's meeting came Monday as President Barack met with Cuban President Raul Castro.


7:50 p.m.

Cuban President Raul Castro is honoring President Barack Obama and the visiting U.S. delegation with a state dinner at Havana's Palace of the Revolution.

Obama and first lady Michelle Obama are being joined at the dinner by senior White House staff and several members of Congress. The gathering caps an extraordinary day of diplomacy between the two presidents, including the Cuban leader's rare participation in a news conference.

State dinner guests were treated to music from the Failde Youth Band, a group dedicated to preserving Cuban music. The menu included shrimp mousse, cream soup flavored with rum, and traditional pork with rice and plantain chips.

In another nod to the local culture, servers had a tray of Cuban cigars on hand for the guests.


7:10 p.m.

One of Cuba's most famous folk singers says he's pleased by thawing ties between Havana and Washington, but cautious given past offenses.

Silvio Rodriguez writes on his blog that "it is commonly forgotten that this terrible dispute began because our neighbors could not stand the fact that we decided what to do in our own home."

Alluding to the United States, he adds that "they were accustomed to having whatever they wanted happen here," and "they not only denied us speech but made war on us."

Rodriguez's blog musings come as U.S. President Barack Obama is in Havana for a historic meeting with Raul Castro.

Rodriguez is considered one of the most important examples of Cuba's "nueva trova" movement and a fervent supporter of the Cuban Revolution.

Much of his music is political, with lyrics that celebrate themes like revolutionary leader Ernesto "Che" Guevara and Playa Giron, the site of the Bay of Pigs invasion.


6:50 p.m.

President Barack Obama says he's willing to meet with former Cuban President Fidel Castro in the future.

In an interview with "World News Tonight with David Muir," Obama says he has no problem with such a meeting "just as a symbol of the end of this Cold War chapter." Obama said a meeting could only take place if the 89-year-old's health was good enough. Castro is believed to be frail. Obama said he had "no idea" when such a meeting could occur.

The White House has been clear it won't be on this trip. In his first visit, Obama has sought to keep the focus on the future of the island nation and its potential for economic growth and reform. A meeting with the aging former revolutionary might undermine that aim.

Deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes told reporters on Monday that "neither we nor the Cubans have even suggested that such a meeting take place" during the president's visit.

Rhodes says the president was speaking about the "potential" for a future meeting: "He was speaking about the fact that there are a variety of ways we're closing the circle on our history."


6:50 p.m.

A top national security adviser to President Obama says he's shared with Cuban authorities many lists of political prisoners over the last two-and-a-half years.

Ben Rhodes, Obama's deputy national security adviser, says the U.S. regularly raises cases of specific political prisoners and that many of the cases have been resolved. But he says Cuba insists that they don't consider them political prisoners. He says the Cuban authorities reply that the prisoners are being held for different crimes.

Rhodes comments come after Cuban President Raul Castro said during a press conference that if he were brought a list of political prisoners, "they will be released before tonight ends."

Rhodes is speaking at a press briefing with reporters in Cuba.

In a recent report Amnesty International did not name any current prisoners of conscience in Cuba.


4:30 p.m.

A crowd of Cuban entrepreneurs, U.S. business people and prominent Cuban-Americans has applauded President Barack Obama's call to help private businesses in Cuba by lifting the trade embargo on the island "once and for all."

Obama is praising Cuba's opening its economy to private enterprise, a change that began in earnest after President Raul Castro took power in 2008. Roughly a half-million Cubans today are small business owners or their employees.

Speaking at a discussion on entrepreneurship, Obama credited the Cuban government with adopting "some reforms" and added that the U.S. "has been proud to help."

He called on Cuba to help small business owners by creating wholesale markets to supply them, unify a complicated dual-currency system and refurbish infrastructure to allow goods to get to market faster.

He said: "I'm absolutely convinced that if given a chance more Cubans can succeed right here at home."


3:40 p.m.

Cubans are expressing shock at seeing President Raul Castro answer questions from reporters, a rare occurrence that was broadcast live on state TV.

Especially interesting were questions for Castro about human rights and political prisoners.

"It's very significant to hear this from our president, for him to recognize that not all human rights are respected in Cuba," said Raul Rios, a 47-year-old driver. Rios says he agrees with the Castro's argument that no country is perfect and all should strive to do better.

Marlene Pino, an engineer, also 47, says: "This is pure history and I never thought I'd see something like this. It's difficult to quickly assimilate what's happening here. For me it's extraordinary to see this."


3:10 p.m.

Cuban President Raul Castro is pushing back against President Barack Obama's call for greater human rights and democracy in Cuba.

Castro restated his government's long-stated position that it simply places different emphasis on a wide range of human rights, assuring its people free health care and education while restricting activities by people it considers to be U.S. agents acting to destabilize the government.

Castro said no country meets all international standards on human rights.

Castro spoke at a news conference with Obama a highly unusual event in the communist country. The session was broadcast live on Cuban state television. Cubans interviewed on the streets said they were shocked at seeing Castro being challenged by reporters.


3:05 p.m.

President Obama says he believes the Cuban trade embargo is going to end, and while he can't predict when that will be, he believes it will happen at some point because the embargo has not served the interest of the U.S. or the Cuban people.

Obama says the U.S. has exercised as much flexibility as it can to make modifications to the embargo, but the list of things his administration can do is growing shorter.

The bulk of changes will rely on Congress. He said that while Congress is not as productive as he would like during elections years, the large number of lawmakers making the trip to Cuba shows a growing interest in lifting the embargo.

Obama says that how quickly that Congress ends the embargo also will likely depend on how Cuba addresses concerns about human rights.


2:40 p.m.

The leaders' press conference has resulted in an extraordinary interchange between CNN reporter Jim Acosta, a second-generation Cuban-American, and Raul Castro, a figure of absolute authority in Cuba who is never subjected to aggressive questioning by the state-controlled press or exposed to questions from independent foreign reporters.

When asked why Cuba has political prisoners, Castro testily addressed Acosta directly, saying "Give me the list now of political prisoners to release ... if there are political prisoners they'll be free before nightfall."

Cuba is criticized for briefly detaining demonstrators thousands of times a year but has drastically reduced its practice of handing down long prison sentences for crimes human rights groups consider to be political. Cuba released dozens of political prisoners as part of its deal to normalize relations with Cuba and Amnesty International said in its 2015/2016 report that it knew of no prisoners of conscience in Cuba.


2:30 p.m.

President Barack Obama says he and Cuban President Raul Castro had a "frank and candid conversation" on human rights and democracy, and are making progress in tearing down barriers between the two nations.

In extended remarks after the first private meeting between the leaders, Obama declared it a "new day" in relations between the U.S. and Cuba.

The president noted the two nations have "very serious differences," particularly on areas regarding freedom of speech, assembly and religious liberty. But Obama says he believes the two governments are capable of having a "constructive dialogue."

Obama noted success in increasing travel between the nations, increased trade and tourism. He says he's working to ease the path for joint corporate ventures and hiring more Cubans in the U.S.

Obama sought to reassure Cubans wary of the return of U.S. engagement. He says: "Cuba's destiny will not be decided by the United States or any other nation. ... The future of Cuba will be decided by Cubans not by anybody else."


2:10 p.m.

Cuban President Raul Castro is calling on President Barack Obama to lift even more restrictions on Cuba.

He's also urging the return of land used for the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay.

Castro says in a statement after Monday's meeting with the U.S. president that he welcomes changes by Obama to allow commercial flights to resume and changes in the area of telecommunications, for example. But he says an economic blockade that remains in place is the "most important obstacle" to Cuba's economic development and the well-being of the Cuban people.

Castro says he recognizes that Obama wants the blockade lifted entirely, but that Congress has refused to go along.

Castro spoke after meeting with Obama in Havana during Obama's historic visit to the island nation.


1 p.m.

Google is opening a cutting-edge online technology center at the studio of one of Cuba's most famous artists, offering free Internet at speeds nearly 70 times faster than currently available to the Cuban public.

President Barack Obama says Google's effort is part of a wider plan to improve Internet access across the island.

The U.S. technology giant has built a studio outfitted with laptops, cellphones and virtual-reality goggles at the complex run by Alexis Leiva Machado, a sculptor known as Kcho.

In an exclusive tour of the site for The Associated Press on Monday, Brett Perlmutter, Google's head of Cuba operations, said the company was optimistic that the studio would be part of a broader cooperative effort to bring Internet access to the Cuban people.

The project has limited reach but enormous symbolic importance in a country that tightly controls of Internet access. Some Cuban officials see the Internet as a potential tool for the U.S. to exert influence over the island's culture and politics.


12:15 p.m.

Western Union is joining the growing list of companies looking to conduct more business in Cuba.

The company says it intends to expand its service handling money transfers to Cuba in response to new regulations announced last week by the Obama administration.

Western Union already handles remittances from the United States to Cuba. Soon, it will begin processing remittances from other countries into Cuba.

Monday's statement from Western Union quotes company executive Odilon Almeida as saying remittances to Cuba fund families and private small businesses and can be a "powerful catalyst for empowerment and innovation."

A key goal of Obama's regulatory changes is to support the island's 400,000 or so private entrepreneurs, who have been allowed to go into business for themselves under economic reforms instituted by President Raul Castro.


10:45 a.m.

In a long-anticipated moment, President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro shook hands warmly and smiled for the cameras as they greeted each other at the Revolutionary Palace.

It was the leaders' first meeting since Obama arrived in Cuba on Sunday and a milestone in the new era of closer relations between the two countries.

Obama and Castro exchanged words briefly, although their remarks were not picked up by the television cameras nearby.

The men then watched a display of Cuban troops. Secretary of State John Kerry, National Security Adviser Susan Rice and several other U.S. officials looked on.

Obama and Castro have met before. They first shook hands in 2013 in South Africa at the Nelson Mandela's funeral.


10:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama's first stop on his first full day in Cuba was Revolutionary Square, home to a memorial to Cuba independence hero Jose Marti.

Obama arrived midmorning for a brief wreath-laying ceremony. Standing in a lineup of Cuba and U.S. officials, the president listened as a military band played both the Cuban and American national anthem. He held his hand on his heart for the "Star Spangled Banner" and watched as three Cuban soldiers carried a massive wreath of red and white roses to the base of the Marti memorial. Obama made no remarks.

The scene was heavy with reminders of Cuba's history.

Behind Obama were striking steel sculptures of two Cuban Revolution figures: Ernesto "Che" Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos.


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