Feb 2, 2016 12:47 AM

The Latest: 8 GOP delegates for Cruz with Iowa caucus win

The Associated Press

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) The latest on developments in Monday's Iowa caucuses, the opening contest in the 2016 race for the White House (all local times):

11:45 p.m.

Ted Cruz's victory in the Iowa caucuses means he'll collect eight delegates to the Republican National Convention.

Donald Trump and Marco Rubio each get seven from the opening contest in the 2016 presidential race.

Coming next is Ben Carson with three, followed by Rand Paul and Jeb Bush one each.

Delegates are awarded in proportion to the statewide vote.

There are three delegates still to be awarded.


11:25 p.m.

How did Ted Cruz do it?

His Iowa victory was propelled by Republican caucus-goers who said they want a candidate who shares their values.

That's according to entrance poll interviews of those arriving at presidential caucus sites on Monday night.

Two-thirds of caucus-goers were born-again Christians, and Cruz was favored over billionaire businessman Donald Trump and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio among that group.

More than 4 in 10 Republican caucus-goers said the candidate quality that mattered most to their vote was that the candidate shares their values.

Among those who said so Cruz on the support of more than 3 in 10, versus just 2 in 10 for Trump or Rubio.

The survey was conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.


11:05 p.m.

However Iowa's Democratic caucuses turn out, Hillary Clinton is assured of at least half of the state's pledged delegates.

The Associated Press has awarded 43 of the 44 pledged delegates at stake. Clinton currently leads Bernie Sanders, 22 to 21.

Her delegate lead so far is due to a stronger performance in a congressional district in the southwestern part of the state.

The remaining delegate to be awarded will go to the winner of Iowa.

Sanders says he and Clinton are in 'virtual tie" in the Monday night caucuses.


10:55 p.m.

Bernie Sanders says it looks like he and Hillary Clinton are in a "virtual tie" for first place in the Iowa's Democratic caucuses.

The Vermont senator is congratulating his chief rival for waging a "very vigorous campaign" in the first contest of the 2016 election.

Sanders who calls himself a democratic socialist says he came to Iowa nine months ago with no money, name recognition or political organization. He says he took on "the most powerful political organization in the United States of America" namely the Clinton family.

Sanders says the people of Iowa have sent a profound message that it's too late for what he calls "establishment politics" in the United States.


10:50 p.m.

Voter turnout for the Iowa Republican caucuses was up when compared with the count four years ago.

There were more than 180,000 people at Monday's GOP caucuses. That's up from about 121,000 in 2012.


10:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton says she's excited for the campaign debate ahead with Bernie Sanders now that they're the only two candidates left in the Democratic presidential primary.

It's too close to call right now in Monday night's Iowa caucuses. But there's already been a big development: Former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has dropped out of the race.

Clinton tells supporters that she's breathing a big sigh of relief. She says Democrats have a clear idea about what their campaign stands for and what's best for the country.


10:25 p.m.

Democrat Martin O'Malley is pulling out of the presidential race after the Iowa caucuses on Monday night, but says the party must "hold strong" behind the eventual nominee.

The former Maryland governor says Democrats must stick to their beliefs, including a responsibility to advance the common good.


10:02 p.m.

Ted Cruz tells The Associated Press that his victory in Iowa's Republican presidential caucuses is a victory for the grassroots, and he says his triumph is part of a larger movement of conservatives against what he calls the "Washington cartel."

Cruz says his win "was a victory for courageous conservatives in Iowa and all around the country."

The first-term Texas senator says that from "Day One, we built our campaign as a movement for Americans to organize and rally to band together against the disaster of the Washington cartel."


9:58 p.m.

Donald Trump says he's honored by what he's calling his second-place finish in Iowa's Republican presidential caucuses.

Trump is speaking at an event with supporters after Ted Cruz was declared the winner of the Monday night contest the first of the 2016 election.

Trump says that when he started the campaign, he was advised not to compete in Iowa because he couldn't finish in the top 10. Trump says he felt he had to do it and wanted to give it a shot.

Trump is congratulating Cruz and the other candidates. He says he thinks he'll win the New Hampshire primary next week and that he will go on to be the GOP nominee and win the White House.


9:50 p.m.

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz might have picked up momentum by winning the Iowa caucuses, but he's not going to collect many delegates.

With his victory, Cruz will get at least eight delegates to the Republican National Convention.

Donald Trump will get at least seven, Marco Rubio will get at least six, Ben Carson will get at least two and Rand Paul will get at least one.

Delegates are awarded in proportion to the statewide vote. There are six delegates still to be awarded.


9:45 p.m.

"We want Ted" is the chant at Ted Cruz's jubilant caucus-night party in Iowa.

And supporters of the Texas senator who won Monday night's Republican caucuses are soon to get their wish. Cruz is flying from Cedar Rapids to Des Moines to join the celebration.

The crowd erupted in cheers when TV screen showed that the race was being called for their favored candidate.


9:40 p.m.

Republican Mike Huckabee says he's ending his second bid for the White House.

The former Arkansas governor writes on Twitter that he's "officially suspending my campaign." He's thanking his backers for their loyal support, adding the hashtag #ImWithHuck.

He joined the race last May, with an announcement in the hometown he shares with former President Bill Clinton. But Huckabee became just one candidate in a crowded field that included many political newcomers.

His campaign failed to take off with candidates like billionaire Donald Trump, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio dominating the race.


9:27 p.m.

It's Ted Cruz on top in the leadoff Republican presidential caucuses in Iowa.

The Texas senator has edged past of Donald Trump and a crowded GOP field.

Cruz won with strong support from Iowa's influential evangelical community and conservative voters.

Cruz's victory in the first contest of the 2016 race comes just four years after he rode a tea party wave to win election to the Senate.

The race now moves to New Hampshire, where Trump has strong support among voters frustrated and angry with Washington.


9:20 p.m.

There are big differences when it comes to the age of caucus-goers in Iowa who say they are supporting Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders.

More than 8 in 10 Democratic caucus-goers under 30 say they came to support Sanders on Monday night, as did nearly 6 in 10 of those between age 30 and 44.

But nearly 6 in 10 caucus-goers between age 45 and 64, and 7 in 10 of those 65 and over, came out to back Clinton.

That's according to entrance poll interviews with people arriving at their caucus sites.

The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as voters arrived at 40 randomly selected sites for Democratic and Republican caucuses.


9 p.m.

Democrat Martin O'Malley has suspended his presidential campaign.

The former Maryland governor and Baltimore mayor never gained traction against rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

Word about O'Malley's move comes from people familiar with his decision. They weren't authorized to discuss it publicly and requested anonymity.

O'Malley campaigned as a can-do chief executive who pushed through key parts of the Democratic agenda in Maryland. They included gun control, support for gay marriage and an increase in the minimum wage.

But O'Malley struggled to raise money and was polling in the single-digits for months despite campaigning actively in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Associated Press writers Ken Thomas and Catherine Lucey contributed to this report.


8:50 p.m.

Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz is the top choice among very conservative caucus-goers in Iowa, while Donald Trump is No. 1 among moderates.

That's according to entrance poll interviews among those arriving at caucus sites conducted by Edison Research for The Associated Press and television networks.

Those who say they're somewhat conservative are split between Marco Rubio and Trump.

Half of GOP caucus-goers say they prefer a candidate from outside the political establishment, while 4 in 10 say they prefer someone with political experience.


8:35 p.m.

The crowd has come alive for Marco Rubio at a concert hall that's hosting caucuses for two Iowa precincts outside Des Moines.

The Florida senator tells caucus-goers that he knows they might have come out to support other candidates in the Republican race. But he also says that he believes "with all my heart I can unite this party."


8:25 p.m.

Ben Carson plans to trade the cold of Iowa for the warmer Florida for a few days.

A campaign spokesman says the Republican presidential candidate is heading home to West Palm Beach after the Iowa caucuses.

Carson plans to speak at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington on Thursday and then will head to New Hampshire.

The plan is to leave Iowa on Monday night in hopes of getting ahead of a winter storm.

"Not standing down" that's what spokesman Jason Osborne posted on Carson's twitter feed.


8:15 p.m.

Donald Trump's voice is hoarse but he still has lots to say.

He's telling 2,000 Republicans in suburban Des Moines, Iowa, that "we're going to win again" and take back the country.

Trump is criticizing the Obama administration's foreign and trade policy, promising to command respect for the United States in the world.

Trump says his mission in the presidential race is to "make America great again."


8:05 p.m.

Early arrivals at Iowa's Democratic caucus sites are split among health care, the economy and income inequality as the top issue facing the country.

That's according to preliminary results of an entrance poll at caucus locations.

Almost 3 in 10 say experience is the most important quality in deciding which candidate to back. What's next? Honesty and someone who cares about people like them.

Six in 10 say the next president should continue President Barack Obama's policies.

The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as voters arrived at 40 randomly selected sites for Democratic caucuses in Iowa.


7:55 p.m.

Republican or Democrat Jeb Bush is criticizing them all.

President Barack Obama. Hillary Clinton. Donald Trump. Ted Cruz. Marco Rubio.

Bush tells supporters in New Hampshire that Obama is "a failed president." And the former Florida governor is hitting Trump though not by name for "insulting" his way toward the presidency.

The latest statewide polls in New Hampshire show Bush in a fight for second place. Trump holds a commanding lead.


7:45 p.m.

Here's what's at stake on the delegate front in the Iowa caucuses.

The Democrats have 44 delegates at stake and the Republicans have 30. That's just a small sliver of what it will take to win each party's nomination.

For Democrats, it will take 2,382 delegates to win the nomination. For Republicans, it will take 1,237.

Hillary Clinton starts off with a big lead because of endorsements by Democratic superdelegates. They're the party leaders who can support the candidate of their choice.

Clinton has 362 endorsements to just eight for Bernie Sanders. Martin O'Malley has two.

Republicans don't have nearly as many superdelegates.


7:37 p.m.

Let the caucusing begin.

On a winter night, Iowans are meeting in party caucuses and express their preferences for the Democratic and Republican candidates in the race for the 2016 nominations.

At stake is crucial early momentum in the campaign. For some candidates, the future of their White House hopes may lie in the balance.


7:10 p.m.

Early arrivals at Iowa's Republican caucus sites are deeply unhappy with how the federal government is working.

That's according to preliminary results of an entrance poll of those arriving at caucus locations.

Four in 10 say they're angry. One-half say they're dissatisfied.

Almost 4 in 10 say the most important quality in a candidate is someone who shares their values.

Also, 2 in 10 want someone who can bring needed change.

The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as voters arrived at 40 randomly selected sites for Democratic and Republican caucuses in Iowa.


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