Jul 7, 2015 4:05 PM

NH1 News Investigates Scandalous Spam: What you need to know to make it stop

NH1.com

Have you been getting creepy or inappropriate text messages on your smart phone?

Some users - including employees here at NH1 News - say they’re getting a huge helping of scandalous scam.

They want to know why and how to stop it.

“Hey you don’t really know me, but I noticed you on my friend’s Facebook…” ...

“Aren’t we supposed to get together for a candlelight dinner later tonight?” ...

“I was thinking about you in the shower today.” ...

“Come chat with me online, so we can get together later for some fun.” ...

“Naughty is my middle name.”

These are some of the text messages Gina Marini says are not coming from a special someone.

“It’s just gross," Marini said. "I don’t want somebody to be randomly texting me, that they’re alone at night and they’re cold and want company. I 'must look hot …' No, I don’t want to hear that.”

She’s not alone.

"This has been going on day after day," Korie Eiles, said. "It comes from a normal looking number - with a 603 area code - so you read it thinking, 'It must be someone I know, whose number I don’t have saved.'"

"And then whoops, no! It’s inappropriate,” Sara Isabelle said.

"The ones that are somewhat flirtatious, and include links - those just started recently - but they’ve been coming in more often," Alexis Scargill said.

The texts have been showing up at all hours of the day, some even in the middle of the night.

"They're very sexual," Eiles said.

Technology Consultant and host of the Manchester radio talk show “Tech Talk” Craig Peterson isn’t surprised about the influx of scandalous spam.

"I’m seeing hundreds of them a day," Peterson said. "These spam texts are becoming more and more of a problem as the hackers get a little bit more sophisticated."

For instance, Peterson said hackers just off our shores are using the National Do Not Call Registry to reach you.

"These people overseas now have more phone numbers than they’ve ever had before," he said.

So when Marini wants to fire back at one spammer, she not only validates her number, but also potentially gets charged for the conversation if she does so.

"Some texts when you send them overseas, cost you as much as five dollars a text,” Peterson said. “So, they make a lot of money by getting you to engage."

If you've responded to spam, check your phone bill and call your provider. Also, forward the texts to the FCC at 7-7-2-6 OR "SPAM."

The Federal Communications Commission won't necessarily investigate your specific case, but it’ll use that information to help shut down some of the worst offenders.

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