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Apr 30, 2015 11:57 AM

Latest on police-custody death: New van stop revealed

The Associated Press

11:50 a.m.

Baltimore police say their investigation into the death of Freddie Gray has revealed a new stop the police van made while transporting Gray.

Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis said the stop was previously unknown to investigators. It was one of four stops the wagon made after Gray was put inside.

Before Gray was put in the van, he asked officers for an inhaler, but didn't get one. At the first stop, Gray was put in leg cuffs because police said he had become irate. The second stop which was only revealed Thursday was discovered by a privately owned camera.

Police did not say whether anything happened during the stop or why it was made. Online maps show the street corner appears to be deserted with three vacant lots and a store nearby.

The van stopped a third time, and the driver asked for an additional unit to check on Gray. At a fourth stop, the wagon picks up an additional prisoner.

Gray suffered a critical spinal injury at some point during his arrest and died a week later.


11:10 a.m.

Baltimore police say they have turned over their criminal investigation to a prosecutor who will decide whether charges are warranted in the death of Freddie Gray.

Gray suffered a mysterious spinal injury while he was in the custody of officers. The prosecutor has not given a timeline for when she will decide on whether to charge the six officers who have been suspended during the investigation of Gray's death.

Gray was arrested April 12 after he made eye contact with officers and ran. After a chase, officers pinned him down and handcuffed him. They loaded him into a van and put leg cuffs on him when officers said he became "irate" in the wagon.

Police said Thursday they discovered a new stop the van made with Gray in it, but they did not say what happened.

Gray was eventually taken to a hospital. He died a week later.


10:30 a.m.

The Rev. Al Sharpton and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake are scheduled to lead a summit on improving relations between police and the community after the death of a black man who was in police custody.

Among those joining Thursday's meeting will be NAACP President Cornell William Brooks and National Urban League President Marc Morial. The meeting is to be held at New Shiloh Baptist Church, where the funeral for Freddie Gray was held Monday.

Gray died from a spinal injury a week after his April 12 arrest. Hours later, violence erupted in the streets near the church. Local clergymen gathered at New Shiloh that evening and staged an impromptu march through the streets to bring calm. Those same clergymen are expected to attend the summit.


10:25 a.m.

Police in Ferguson, Missouri, are investigating burglaries of a discount store and a cellphone business near where protesters took to the streets for a second night.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1JCb12T ) says Wednesday night's break-ins at a Family Dollar store and STL Cordless took place a night after looting, fires and gunfire broke out during demonstrations in the St. Louis suburb.

Several dozen people marched down Ferguson's West Florissant Avenue on Wednesday night to protest the recent death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray while he was in Baltimore police custody.

The demonstrators also referenced last summer's fatal shooting by a white Ferguson police officer of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was black and unarmed. Brown's death sparked months of sometimes violent protests in the area.


5:30 a.m.

A nighttime curfew for Baltimore that began at 10 p.m. Wednesday ended Thursday at 5 a.m. with no major disturbances reported.

It was the second night of the curfew, which was put in place after riots Monday over the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died from injuries he received while in police custody.


11 p.m.

Protesters have returned to Ferguson a day after looting, fires and gunfire broke out during demonstrations over the death of a black man who died of spinal injuries after his arrest by Baltimore police.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports several dozen people marched down West Florissant Avenue in the St. Louis suburb Wednesday night protesting the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray.

That same area was the site of numerous protests after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who was black and unarmed, by a white Ferguson police officer in August.

A Ferguson Police Department spokesman says three people were shot during protests Tuesday night and four police cars were damaged by rocks and chunks of asphalt thrown by demonstrators.


Several hundred people have gathered in New York to protest the death of Freddie Gray, a Baltimore man who was critically injured in police custody, and at least 60 people have been arrested.

Protesters Wednesday first rallied in Manhattan's Union Square, where they chanted "no justice, no peace" and "hands up, don't shoot," a reference to the police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, last year. Police officers stood and watched.

A police helicopter hovered overhead, and a police loudspeaker warned the protesters that they would be arrested if they marched in the street.

A group of protesters spilled into the street and disrupted traffic. Dozens of police officers moved in with plastic handcuffs and began making arrests while officers with batons pushed the crowd back onto the sidewalk.


10:45 p.m.

Civic leaders declared victory when the intersection at North and Pennsylvania avenues had been cleared of all but a few stragglers 15 minutes after the beginning of Baltimore's curfew.

As of 10:30 Wednesday night, police hadn't taken action against the very few who remained out.

Hundreds of police officers in riot gear remained at the scene, which was the site of rioting Monday, with nothing to do.

"We are very proud of what has happened here tonight. We are proud of our city," Rep. Elijah Cummings said after everyone had gone home. He promised that the investigation into Freddie Gray's death in police custody will remain a top priority.

State Sen. Catherine Pugh noted that members of the community took the lead in clearing the streets, allowing police officers to hang back.

"I think we showed the nation that Baltimore can protect the peace," Pugh said.

She also urged the community to be patient with the Gray investigation. Police are scheduled to provide a report Friday to the state's attorney. But Pugh said that office will need time to review the evidence.

"We have to give her time and her office time to wade through those papers," Pugh said.


10:10 p.m.

A few minutes after the city-wide curfew, only a couple dozen people are left at the scene of Monday's rioting in Baltimore.

Police are clearing the streets for the 10 p.m. curfew Wednesday. A police helicopter is broadcasting a warning to stragglers: "You must go home. You will be subject to an arrest."

During the day, residents continued to protest the death of Freddie Gray, who died after injuries he suffered in police custody.


9:45 p.m.

Shortly before 10 p.m., Baltimore police in riot gear began to shut down North Avenue by lining up in the intersection.

Traffic had been flowing freely at the corner of North and Pennsylvania avenues, the site of Monday night's looting as people rioted over the police-custody death of Freddie Gray. On Tuesday night, the intersection had been closed to traffic, blocked by a line of police in riot gear.

As he did Tuesday night, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., who represents the area, was on the scene asking more than 100 protesters to go home ahead of the 10 p.m. curfew.

"I'm hoping that people will listen," Cummings said. "This is my neighborhood. I know a lot of these people."

Community members forcefully urged others to go home ahead of the curfew, and a few fights broke out within the crowd. But they were quickly broken up.


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