NECMF

Jul 12, 2016 4:09 PM

If you're playing Pokemon Go, you're giving the company permission to read your emails

The Associated Press

Adam Reeve, principal architect of security firm Red Owl, however, found that Pokemon Go required overly broad permission for those using a Google account as a sign-in.

Even setting aside the location data collected by the app, he said, the app is a "huge security risk." He noted the app, in theory, could allow Pokemon Go to read one's Gmail, send email as you and access your Google search history.

On Monday, Niantic said in a blog post that it never intended to request such sweeping data access, hasn't collected information beyond the user's ID and email address, and is working with Google to pare back the authorization.

The Pokemon Go craze has sent legions of players hiking around cities and battling with "pocket monsters" on their smartphones. It marks a turning point for augmented reality, or technology that superimposes a digital facade on the real world.

But the game's popularity has created unintended consequences in everyday life, from annoyed property owners dealing with hordes of monster hunters to store owners using the game to attract customers.

So have you caught them all yet?

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