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Nov 4, 2014 11:45 PM

Ballot measures: DC votes OK legalized pot

The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) Voters in the District of Columbia approved a ballot measure Tuesday legalizing possession of marijuana by adults.

Barring an attempt by Congress to block the move, the nation's capital will join the company of Colorado and Washington state, where voters approved the recreational use of pot two years ago.

Two more Western states, Oregon and Alaska, had marijuana-legalization measures on their ballots Tuesday.

Other volatile issues on state ballots include gambling and abortion. Two competing measures in Washington state gave voters a choice on whether to expand background checks for gun sales.

The District of Columbia's marijuana measure does not provide for the legal sale of marijuana, leaving that matter up to the D.C. Council. That's different from the measures in Oregon and Alaska, which would follow the example of Colorado and Washington state in setting up systems for regulating and taxing retail sales of marijuana,

The D.C. measure would make it legal to possess up to two ounces of pot and up to three mature marijuana plants for personal use. It won't take effect until after a review by Congress.

The campaign in D.C. included a debate about race the measure's supporters said blacks in the city had been disproportionately targeted for marijuana arrests.

Gary Fulwood, a support staffer for the city's fire and EMS department, voted for the initiative.

"The criminal justice system is getting bogged down by marijuana use, and a lot of the people who use marijuana aren't criminals," Fulwood said. "I don't see it being any worse than alcohol."

In Florida, a measure that would have allowed marijuana use for medical reasons fell short of the 60 percent approval to pass; near-complete returns showed it getting about 57 percent of the votes. Twenty-three other states allow medical marijuana.

Some of the other questions before voters Tuesday:


In Colorado and North Dakota, voters rejected measures that opponents feared could lead to bans on abortion.

The Colorado proposal would have added "unborn human beings" to the state's criminal code. It was the third measure on Colorado ballots in recent years seeking to grant "personhood" to the unborn.

North Dakota voters rejected an amendment that would have declared in the state constitution "the inalienable right to life of every human being at every stage of development must be recognized and protected."

A too-close-to-call measure in Tennessee would give state legislators more power to regulate abortion. Supporters said the proposed amendment is needed to prevent the courts from quashing reasonable restrictions; opponents fear it would lead to tough new laws that would jeopardize women's access to abortions.


In Massachusetts, voters passed up a chance to say "No" to casinos. They rejected a measure that would have repealed a 2011 law authorizing development of a slots parlor and up to three resort casinos. There are none in the state now, but casino plans have been approved for three cities across the state.

A victory for the anti-casino forces would have marked the first time at least since the modern era of U.S. gambling began in 1931 that a state reversed a major legislative decision to expand gambling.


Voters in Arkansas and Nebraska approved increases in their states' minimum wages. In Arkansas, it will rise from $6.25 an hour to $8.50 by 2017, in Nebraska from $7.25 to $9. Two other states Alaska and South Dakota also were voting on minimum wage increases.


Massachusetts voters approved a measure that supporters say will establish the nation's strongest requirement for providing paid sick time to workers. Workers will be able to accrue up to 40 hours of paid sick time in a given year, earning one hour for every 30 hours worked. Companies with 10 or fewer employees would be exempt.


In Missouri, voters defeated a measure bitterly opposed by teachers' unions that would have tied teachers' jobs and salaries to the performance of their students.

Teachers unions were supporting an initiative in Washington state that would reduce class size and increase staffing support in grades K-12. State financial experts believe the measure would eventually cost the state about $2 billion a year to pay for thousands more teachers and other school staff.


Colorado voters rejected a measure that would have required labeling of certain genetically modified foods. The proposal would have applied to raw and packaged foods produced entirely or partially by genetic engineering, but not apply to food served in restaurants.

A similar measure was on the ballot in Oregon.

Opponents of the requirements including food corporations and biotech firms said mandatory labels would mislead consumers into thinking engineered ingredients are unsafe, which scientists have not proven.


Washington state had two competing gun-related measures. One seeks background checks for all gun sales and transfers, including private transactions. The other would prevent any such expansion covering purchases from private sellers.

Supporters of the expanded checks, bolstered by gifts from Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul Allen, have spent far more than the anti-expansion campaign.

Six states require universal background checks for all sales and transfers of firearms. Washington's law, like the federal law, requires checks for sales or transfers by licensed dealers but not for purchases from private sellers.

If both measures on Washington's ballot pass, it might be up to the courts to sort out the confusion.


Of the 147 ballot measures nationwide, the two that generated the most campaign spending were health-policy proposals in California. One measure would allow more expensive malpractice lawsuits and make California the first state requiring many doctors to submit to random drug and alcohol tests; the other would require the state insurance commissioner's approval before health insurance rates could be changed.


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