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 Blizzard to blame for MetroCast outage as many NH customers still don't have service

Blizzard2017

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1 week ago

Blizzard to blame for MetroCast outage as many NH customers still don't have service

Nearly 24 hours after Tuesday's blizzard, several New Hampshire towns serviced by MetroCast are off the grid.

Approximately 20 towns across the state were without phone, television or Internet service late Wednesday afternoon, according to Michael Todd, spokesman for the Department of Safety.

This outage comes after tens of thousands of customers lost power during the storm, mostly concentrated on the Seacoast and in the Lakes Region.

"Now we are seeing that there's significant damage to the MetroCast infrastructure that's causing communication outages in the southern and central portions of the state," Todd said.

According to an update posted to MetroCast NH's Facebook page, the communities affected included: Alexandria, Alton, Alton Bay, Barnstead, Belmont, Bridgewater, Bristol, Center Barnstead, Center Harbor, Deerfield, Epsom, Franklin, Gilford, Gilmanton, Hebron, Laconia, Meredith, New Durham, New Hampton, Northfield, Northwood, Pittsfield, Sanbornton, Strafford, Tilton and Wolfeboro.

The statement said because of the storm conditions, crews had to wait until downed poles, trees and wires were cleared before they could access the damaged facilities.

Todd said the Department of Safety is also working with MetroCast and town emergency management officials to restore services.

"We're expecting about two-thirds of the towns to be restored by 6 o'clock (Wednesday)," he added. "With any luck, the remainder will be restored by close of business (day) tomorrow."

In its most recent update, MetroCast thanked customers for their patience and understanding.

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1 week ago

Town-by-town: Snow totals top 16 inches in NH, wind gusts over 50 mph

Here are the latest storm reports from National Weather Service storm spotters.

The snow totals have been rounded to the nearest half-inch.

SOUTHERN NH

Stratham – 23.5”
Goffstown – 20”
Nottingham – 19”
Exeter – 18”
East Rochester – 18”
Weare – 17.5”
North Brookline – 17”
Plaistow – 17”
Deering – 17”
New Boston – 16”
Brookline – 16”
West Hampstead – 16”
Kensington – 16”
Concord – 15.6”
Atkinson – 15.5”
Merrimack – 15”
Hudson – 14.5”
Dover – 14.5”
Keene – 14.5”
Jaffrey – 14.5”
Milford – 14”
Manchester – 14”
Merrimack – 14”
Strafford – 14”
Rindge – 14”
Kingston – 14”
Westmoreland – 13”
East Hampstead – 13”
Nashua – 12”
Seabrook – 11.5”

CENTRAL NH

East Wakefield – 21”
Northfield – 21”
Madison – 20”
Madison – 19"
Canterbury – 17”
Bristol – 16.5”
Chichester – 15”
Wolfeboro Bay – 15”
Meredith – 14”


NORTHERN NH

Randolph – 21.5”
Berlin – 19”
North Conway – 18”
Milan – 18”
Pittsburg – 14”
Littleton – 14”
Franconia – 11.5”

TOP WIND GUSTS

Newington – 62 mph
Portsmouth – 58 mph
Windham – 55 mph
Meredith – 51 mph
Center Harbor – 51 mph
Derry – 50 mph
Lincoln – 49 mph
Salem – 49 mph
Sanbornton – 48 mph
Gilford – 48 mph
Sunapee – 46 mph

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1 week ago

Winds accompanying 2017 blizzard leaves thousands in NH without power

As the winds begin to pick up across New Hampshire during the 2017 blizzard, power outages are leaving thousands in the dark.

READ: Tuesday nor'easter to bring 60+ mph wind gusts, could leave thousands without power

Meteorologist Ryan Breton predicted that during the height of the storm, a combination of wet, pasty snow and strong wind gusts would cause power outages in parts of the state.

Northeasterly winds will increase to between 15 mph and 25 mph during Tuesday afternoon. Wind gusts to 60 mph are expected at the coast, 40 mph inland. Some higher gusts cannot be ruled out.

As of 2:30 p.m., 4,441 power outages were reported throughout New Hampshire. The most coming from Eversource at 1,936.

NH1 News will update the numbers as the storm continues.

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1 week ago

UPDATE: 1st reported snowstorm-related death in NH ID'd as police dispatcher's daughter

GILFORD — Police have identified a teen killed in a single-vehicle crash as the daughter of a dispatcher for the Gilford Police Department.

The Gilford Police Department said in a tweet that Ava, the daughter of dispatcher Tim Doris, was killed in a car crash Tuesday morning.

READ: NH teen killed after car crashes off snow-covered Gilford road

Gilford police responded to the single-vehicle accident on Route 11A in the vicinity of Rocky Road about 7 a.m. where they encountered a vehicle that had left the roadway and hit a tree.

Police said snow-covered roads are believed to have been a factor in the crash. This is the first reported death in New Hampshire related to Tuesday's nor'easter and blizzard.

The Gilford Police Department set up a Meal Train to assist the family as they grieve.

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1 week ago

NH teen killed after car crashes off snow-covered Gilford road

GILFORD — Snow-covered roads and slick conditions from Tuesday's nor'easter claimed the life of a New Hampshire teen.

Gilford police responded to a single-vehicle accident on Route 11A in the vicinity of Rocky Road about 7 a.m. where they encountered a vehicle that had left the roadway and hit a tree.

The sole 16-year-old female operator was extricated and transported to Lakes Region General Hospital where she was later pronounced dead.

Police have not released her name since she is a juvenile and family members are still being contacted. It's unknown where the teen was driving to but schools in Gilford were canceled for the day.

Due to the seriousness of the crash, police closed a portion of Route 11A for several hours while the crash was being investigated.

At this time, police are withholding additional information about the crash until the reconstruction team has completed its investigation.

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1 week ago

Blizzard grounds most flights in and out of New England

MANCHESTER — Almost all the flights in and out of Manchester-Boston Regional Airport have been canceled.

Crews at the airport were working steadily Tuesday to keep the runways clear.

The flights board at Boston Logan International Airport had similar listings, with almost all flights in and out of the airport being canceled.

Blizzard warnings are in effect for southeast New Hampshire, where the combination of heavy snow and strong winds will create whiteout conditions during the height of the nor'easter Tuesday afternoon into early evening.

READ: Height of the storm hits Tuesday afternoon and evening with blizzard conditions

The airports are asking travelers to check with their airlines on cancellations before heading to the airport.

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1 week ago

Height of the storm hits Tuesday afternoon and evening with blizzard conditions

Snow has moved into the Granite State, but the height of the storm comes Tuesday afternoon into early evening.

Blizzard warnings are in effect for southeast New Hampshire, where the combination of heavy snow and strong winds will create whiteout conditions during the height of the nor'easter Tuesday afternoon.

The rest of the state is in a winter storm warning, for widespread heavy snow accumulations.

HEIGHT OF THE STORM: 12 TO 7 PM TUESDAY

Heavy snow currently in the Mid-Atlantic and Connecticut moves northward, arriving in New Hampshire after 12 p.m.

As these bands of snow move in, expect snow to fall at the rate of at least 1 inch per hour. At times, especially during the middle part of the afternoon, snow may fall at the rate of 2 up to 4 inches in just one hour.

Driving will be dangerous and nearly impossible in these heavy bands of snow. Roads may become impassable, and those driving are putting others at risk by being on the roads.

During the mid to late afternoon, the wind will become more of a problem. Wind is a concern statewide, but especially in southeast New Hampshire. Northeasterly wind gusts between 50 and 60 mph are possible. Some higher gusts cannot be ruled out. Combined with heavy, wet snow, power outages are likely.

WEDNESDAY: SNOW SHOWERS, SQUALLS

The storm will be long gone by Wednesday. Expect clouds with some partial sunshine at times. High temperatures will be in the 20s north to near 30 in southern New Hampshire.

It's possible schools will delay or cancel classes as the clean-up begins.

However, snow showers will linger in the mountains for much of the day.

A few heavier snow squalls cannot be ruled out during the afternoon, even in central and southern New Hampshire. The time frame for these would be after 3 p.m.

Snow squalls are quick-moving snow showers that hit like a summertime thunderstorm, with a downpour of snow and gusty winds. Quickly lowering visibility, and dropping a coating to an inch of snow in a matter of minutes, they are notorious for causing problems for drivers.

"BLIZZARD" CONDITIONS MAY BE MET

A storm is officially considered a blizzard when the following criteria is met at a particular location: Frequent wind gusts to 35 mph and quarter-mile or lower visibility in snow (which can be blowing, drifting, falling, or all three), for at least three consecutive hours.

The odds are highest of this official criteria occurring in southeast New Hampshire.

SNOW TOTALS

Most of the state will receive a foot of snow. Many areas will see around 16 up to 20 inches, including Manchester, Concord, and Nashua.

The highest totals, closer to 2 feet, are expected in the Monadnock Region and in the eastern part of the Lakes Region.

A wetter, pastier snow will keep accumulations limited to 10 to 16 inches near the seacoast. Still, this amount of snow is falling in a very short period of time, causing major problems.

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1 week ago

NH Emergency Operations Center to open at 4 p.m. during 2017 blizzard

The New Hampshire Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) will open the Emergency Operations Center at 4 p.m. Tuesday.

The 2017 blizzard is expected to bring a foot to two-feet of snow Tuesday through Wednesday accompanied by strong winds Tuesday afternoon.

“We’re monitoring the storm closely and will continue to coordinate the state’s response to this storm throughout the night,” Director of HSEM Perry Plummer said. “Conference calls were held Monday with federal, state and local partners to ensure everyone had the latest information and all preparations had been made regarding the storm.”

The HSEM recommends that drivers avoid traveling when possible as conditions will become treacherous.

“Our biggest concern right now is the treacherous driving conditions,” Plummer said. “The rapid rate of snow fall coupled with strong wind gusts will create quickly changing conditions with low to no visibility. We’re asking everyone to avoid travel when possible.”

Visit ReadyNH.gov for the latest safety information regarding the storm and to learn more about keeping safe during emergencies.

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1 week ago

Over 3,000 NH residents already without power as Nor'easter's snow rolls in

Power outages are beginning to accompany the March Nor'easter, leaving thousands in the dark.

READ: Tuesday nor'easter to bring 60+ mph wind gusts, could leave thousands without power

During the height of the storm, a combination of wet, pasty snow and strong wind gusts will cause power outages in parts of the state. These outages have already begun, mainly due to accidents.

READ: Catch live traffic alerts when crashes happen as Nor'easter pounds NH

Northeasterly winds will increase to between 15 and 25 mph during Tuesday afternoon. Wind gusts to 60 mph are expected at the coast, 40 mph inland. Some higher gusts cannot be ruled out.

As of 9 a.m., 3,436 power outages were reported throughout New Hampshire. The most coming from Eversource at 2,571.

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1 week ago

PHOTO GALLERY: Here's what it looks like around NH as Nor'easter blows through

A powerful nor'easter pounded the Northeast early Tuesday, prompting flight cancellations, school closures and warnings from city and state officials to stay off the roads.

As the blizzard continues to get stronger, we want to know and show what it looks like around the Granite State.

Have a cool picture? Are your kiddos or pets enjoying the snow?

Send us your photos via email to news@nh1.com, message them to us on Facebook or tweet them at us @NH1News.

And make sure to check out traffic alerts here!

Photo courtesy to Andy Mack Jr., Cyrena-Marie Arnold, Laura Vinson, nurselynda55, Daniel Sklut, Kathie Shea, Steve Courant, Jeff Hastings, David Cormier Jr., Tara Madison, Eli Vitas, Robin Bruedle, Brandy Amy Tripp, Melissa Anderson Salisbury, Kathy Robbins Kenny, Bekey Bordonaro, Cassandra Hamilton, and Cheryl Heymans.

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1 week ago

As blizzard brings whiteout conditions to NH, state urges drivers to stay off roads

The powerhouse storm has dumped snow across New Hampshire, leaving crashes and lane closures as it begins to ramp up.

SEE LIVE TRAFFIC UPDATES HERE (brought to you by WAZE)

NH 109 at NH 28 in Wolfeboro is closed. CLEARED

NH 140 in the area of the Gilmanton Safety Office is closed because of a tree in utility wires.

I-93 NB in Windham at Exits 3 to 4 is closed. CLEARED

RT 109 IN Moultonborough closed at RT 25 for fallen trees and wires.

NH 109 in Tuftonboro between Craig Way and the Fire Department is closed for utility wires down in the roadway.

NH 108 in Stratham at Stratham Greenis closed for an obstruction in the road.

US 1B at Cabotway in Newcastle closed for downed power lines.

NH 175A in Holderness is closed from NH 175 to Exit 25. Utility wires down in the roadway.

The NH 33 detour to Palm Drive in Greenland is closed for a downed power line.

Wires down closed Route 121 in Plaistow.

The right lane on the Spaulding Turnpike in Rochester near mile marker 16 is closed. CLEARED

A disabled vehicle reduced the Nashua Everett Turnpike northbound in the area of exit 2 to one lane. CLEARED

The right lane before exit 19 on Interstate 93 northbound in Northfield is closed. CLEARED

The exit 3 on ramp on Interstate 93 in Windham is closed due to a crash. CLEARED

The Nashua Everett Turnpike southbound is reduced to one lane near exit 2. CLEARED

UPDATED TRAFFIC ALERT: Nashua Everett TPK Southbound exit 2 roadway reduced to one lane

— NHDOT Everett (@NHDOTEverett) March 14, 2017

The right lane is closed on Everett Turnpike northbound in Merrimack near mile marker 13.8. CLEARED

The right lane between exits 8 and 10 on the Everett Turnpike in Merrimack is closed. CLEARED

The left lane on Interstate 93 southbound near mile marker 62.4 is closed. CLEARED

Beware of a crash on Interstate 293 southbound north of exit 1.

The exit 4 off ramp is closed on the Nashua Everett Turnpike northbound. CLEARED

A crash at the Interstate 93 southbound in Windham closed the left and right shoulder by the weigh station. CLEARED

A crash on the ramp from NH 101 westbound to Interstate 93 northbound closed two lanes on the ramp. CLEARED

The right shoulder is closed on Interstate 93 southbound exit 5 off ramp in Londonderry. CLEARED

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1 week ago

Staring down the barrel of nor'easter, region preps for snow

NEW YORK (AP) — Sandwiched between days that felt like spring last week and the official start of spring next week, a "life-threatening" nor'easter is poised to bring a reminder that winter isn't over yet, with blizzard conditions and a blanket of heavy snow expected in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

Meteorologists were calling for snowfall totals as high as 20 inches in New York City from the storm's start late Monday through Tuesday evening. The National Weather Service warned that blizzard conditions of wind gusts over 35 mph and low visibility would extend from the Philadelphia area to Maine.

The weather service's office near Philadelphia called the storm "life-threatening" and warned people to "shelter in place." Coastal flooding was also predicted.

Travel was sure to be dismal: About 5,000 Tuesday flights were canceled as of late Monday afternoon , Amtrak canceled and modified service up and down the Northeast Corridor and motorists were urged to stay off the roads.

In New York City, the above-ground portions of the subway system were being shut down from 4 a.m. Tuesday. Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy imposed a statewide travel ban beginning at 5 a.m.

The forecast prompted early decisions to close schools on Tuesday in New York City, Philadelphia, Boston and many places in between.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio urged residents to avoid unnecessary travel and help keep the roads clear. "We're preparing for a significant storm on Tuesday, and New Yorkers should also prepare for snow and dangerous road conditions," de Blasio said.

The storm comes a week after the region saw temperatures climb into the 60s. Spring officially starts on March 20.

Bank teller Jana White said her plans for riding out the storm include "lots of hot chocolate and a couple of sappy movies." The 23-year-old Trenton, New Jersey, resident said she expects to get Tuesday off work.

"It's a reminder that winter is always ready to take shot at you, so you have to stay prepared," she said. "We've got food and snacks and drinks, so as long as the power stays on we should be in good shape."

The heaviest snowfall was expected Tuesday morning through the afternoon, with snowfall rates as high as 2 to 4 inches per hour. Coastal flood warnings were in effect from Massachusetts to Delaware.

Boston could get 12 to 18 inches, with isolated amounts of up to 2 feet across northeastern Massachusetts.

In Philadelphia, where up to a foot of snow could fall, crews began treating some area roadways on Sunday.

Farther south in the nation's capital, where the National Cherry Blossom Festival is scheduled to start Wednesday, snow accumulations of 6 to 8 inches were expected.

That led German Chancellor Angela Merkel to postpone her trip to Washington for her first face-to-face meeting with President Donald Trump. Merkel had been scheduled to arrive late Monday night for meetings with Trump on Tuesday. The White House said the meeting was rescheduled for Friday.

Baltimore is expected to get 8 to 12 inches.

The storm also changed plans for some teams competing in the NCAA tournament: Villanova, the top overall seed in the men's tournament, left Philadelphia early to get ahead of the storm.

As the East Coast prepared, the Midwest was hit with snow, forcing a number of flight cancellations. In Chicago, the forecast called for 3 to 6 inches of snow, the city's first significant snowfall since mid-December.

Southern portions of Minnesota got more than 9 inches of snow in some areas. In Michigan, utility crews worked in the snow to restore power to those still without electricity following high winds that hit the state on Wednesday.

___

Associated Press writer Bruce Shipkowski contributed to this report from Trenton, New Jersey.

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1 week ago

As another nor'easter hits the Granite State, NH1 News will provide updates throughout the day

As yet another nor'easter pounds the Granite State, NH1 News meteorologist Ryan Breton will be tracking the storm and providing live updates throughout the day.

WATCH LIVE UPDATES HERE

Starting at 8 a.m., Ryan will go live on Facebook every other hour to give the latest snow totals and progression of the storm.

NH1 will also be tracking driving conditions, power outages and coastal flooding as the storm progresses.

Be sure to like NH1 News on Facebook and download the NH1 News app to get the latest weather updates!

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1 week ago

Blizzard hits NH causing power outages as state braces for 1 to 2 feet of snow

Blizzard warnings have been issued for southeast New Hampshire, where the combination of heavy snow and strong winds will create whiteout conditions during the height of the nor'easter Tuesday afternoon.

Snow will move in Tuesday morning, and quickly become heavy. The heaviest snow will fall from around 12 p.m. through early evening.

Driving will be dangerous and nearly impossible during the height of the storm. Roads may become impassable, and those driving are putting others at risk by being on the roads.

FULL FORECAST: Expected snow totals, timeline

The National Weather Service issued the warnings for Rockingham, Strafford, and eastern Hillsborough counties, where official blizzard criteria has the highest chance of being met.

The rest of New Hampshire is in a winter storm warning.

Wind is a concern statewide, but especially in southeast New Hampshire. Northeasterly wind gusts between 50 and 60 mph are possible. Some higher gusts cannot be ruled out. Combined with heavy, wet snow, power outages are likely.

MORE: Tuesday's nor'easter to bring 60+ mph wind gusts, could leave thousands without power

It's impossible to predict the extent of outages ahead of time, but this is one of those storms that could produce tens of thousands in outages.

BLIZZARD DEFINITION

A storm is officially considered a blizzard when the following criteria is met at a particular location: Frequent wind gusts to 35 mph and quarter-mile or lower visibility in snow (which can be blowing, drifting, falling, or all three), for at least three consecutive hours.

The odds are highest of this official criteria occurring in southeast New Hampshire.

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1 week ago

Over 1,500 flights canceled ahead of major snowstorm, including more than half in Manchester

MANCHESTER — Up to 21 flights departing from Manchester have been canceled as New Hampshire awaits Tuesday's major snowstorm.

According to Flightaware.com, 21 flights departing from the Manchester-Boston regional airport, as well as 21 flights coming into the airport have been cancelled for Tuesday. That is more than half of the day's incoming and outgoing flights in the Queen City, with more likely to be announced.

The cancellations come before the major storm that is expected to sweep the Granite State on Tuesday.

READ: Major storm to hit NH with 10 to 20 inches of snow, blizzard conditions Tuesday

More than 1,500 flights have already been canceled nationwide due to the expected conditions, according to USA Today. That number is likely to rise as well.

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1 week ago

NH city declares snow emergency in preparation for major snowstorm bringing 10 to 20 inches

NASHUA — The City of Nashua declared a snow emergency as New Hampshire braces for a major snowstorm.

READ: Major storm to hit NH with 10 to 20 inches of snow, blizzard conditions Tuesday

The snow emergency is scheduled to start Tuesday at 2 p.m. and last until Wednesday at 6 a.m., depending on changes to weather conditions.

Officials warn people who do not need to be out on the roads to stay off them for their safety. Residents should expect only primary routes to be cleared during the storm.

No on-street or municipal surface parking is allowed during the snow emergency. Free parking will be made available in the Elm and High streets garages. The overnight parking program is also suspended.

All vehicles remaining on the street and in the municipal surface lots will be towed for a fine of $315.

Check with your city or town hall for local parking bans.

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1 week ago

Sununu 'strongly' recommends elections be held despite snowstorm as growing list of towns postpone

CONCORD — With a powerful blizzard forecast to slam into New Hampshire on Tuesday, a growing list of towns are posting voting.

But Gov. Chris Sununu says that communities that delay their local elections do so "at their own risk."

Throughout Monday, more and more towns announced they would delay their voting. Among them were Derry, Londonderry, Hudson, Bedford and Rye. Earlier in the day the New Hampshire Secretary of State's office said state law mandated the voting take place on the second Tuesday in March.

With snow expected to start falling across the state starting Tuesday morning, and with up to 20 inches forecast in some areas, travel could be treacherous.

Sununu said he's "strongly" recommending but not mandating that towns stay open to allow voting. And he emphasized that towns that postpone their elections do so “at their own risk.”

After a phone call with local officials, the governor said “I don’t think we’re in a position to mandate that towns stay open or reverse their direction if they so choose not to, but we do strongly recommend that they do stay open."

"If towns do choose, and make that choice on their own, at their risk, frankly, to make a decision to postpone their voting. We got on the phone and wanted to make them aware of some recommendations that we had, such as ensuring that someone was at least available either at the polling places or town offices with absentee ballots so folks coming in to vote could at least obtain an absentee ballot, if they were not going to be available for the rescheduled voting day," he added.

About 90 minutes after the governor’s comments, the top two Democrats in the State House urged that the legislature must act to eliminate confusion and ensure that any town that needs to postpone their town elections tomorrow due to the impending snowstorm can do so.”

In a statement, state Senate Minority Leader Jeff Woodburn and state House of Representatives Minority Leader Steve Shurtleff said “we have a solemn duty to ensure the safety of our citizens and no election should require voters to risk their safety in order to participate. Our election workers and town moderators are well-trained and take the task of facilitating transparent and fair elections seriously. We should trust them to make the best decision for their communities and for the safety of their people.”

The two lawmakers said they’ll attempt to introduce emergency legislation at Wednesday’s Senate Rules Committee to make sure that results from elections postponed due to the snowstorm are “enforceable” so that local officials “can make the right decision for their communities without fear of a legal challenge.”

Earlier on Monday New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlon told NH1 Newsy that "our phones have been ringing off the hook about the snowstorm tomorrow and the impact that might have on the town elections."

"The position from this office is that, RSA669:1, which is in the section of the statute that talks about town elections, says very clearly that town elections shall be held on the second Tuesday in March. From our perspective there is no provision that allows for the actual statutory date of the election officers to be moved and we cannot recall it ever happening for weather or any other reason," Scanlan said.

Among the towns delaying their voting are Bedford, Candia and Hudson, which re-scheduled their elections for Thursday. And Pelham rescheduled it's town meeting for Thursday as well.

Hudson is home to state House of Representatives Speaker Shawn Jasper. Monday morning on Jack Heath's popular talk radio program New Hampshire Today, the Speaker criticized town moderators who were postponing elections due to the pending snowstorm.

Rye delayed it's voting until Saturday.

Derry, Londonderry, Atkinson, Northwood, Newfields, and Hollis announced that they will hold their election one week later, on March 21. Hampstead has pushed their voting back until March 28.

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1 week ago

Major storm to hit NH with 10 to 20 inches of snow, blizzard conditions Tuesday

Tuesday's storm is going to be serious. We've had storms with just as much snow this winter, but this one will hit quickly and hit hard.

Watch

A foot or more of snow will fall in just 12 hours. Whiteouts and blizzard conditions are expected during the height of the storm Tuesday afternoon, making travel extremely dangerous and even impossible at times.

READ: Will snowstorm postpone town elections across New Hampshire?

Damaging wind gusts will cause power outages during the height of the storm.

THE TIMELINE

The first flakes will fall near the Massachusetts border between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Snow overspreads the rest of southern and central New Hampshire between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Snow will move into the northern half of the state between 10 a.m. and noon.

Once it begins, the snow will quickly become heavy, with roads becoming snow covered and slippery in a short period of time.

The height of the storm will be from about noon to 7 p.m. During this time, snow will fall at the rate of 1 to 3 inches per hour. "Thundersnow" is likely in spots. Whiteout, near blizzard conditions will make travel extremely dangerous and even impossible at times during the afternoon and early evening.

During the evening, the snow will start to taper and lessen in intensity.

Snow showers will linger into Wednesday morning, but the accumulating snow will end in most places Tuesday night.

IMPACT ON LOCAL ELECTIONS

Tuesday is Election Day for towns across New Hampshire. Some have already postponed voting due to the storm. Check with your town to see if they have made changes as a result of the storm.

STRONG WIND GUSTS

Northeast winds will be damaging during the height of the storm. Usually in these situations, strong wind gusts are limited to the coastline. However, in this case, strong gusts are also possible inland. This means power outages are possible throughout the entire state. Make the necessary preparations just in case you lose power.

READ: Tuesday nor'easter to bring 60+ mph wind gusts, could leave thousands without power

The strongest winds will be Tuesday afternoon and Tuesday evening. Northeast wind gusts to 60+ mph are likely near the seacoast, 40+ mph inland. These strong winds will combine with the heavy snow to create blizzard conditions.

SNOW TOTALS

In total, a widespread 10 to 20 inches of snow is expected across New Hampshire.

We have done our best to highlight which areas have the highest chance of receiving the highest amounts.

It's possible a few areas see over 20 inches, near 2 feet.

Totals may range quite a bit from town to town depending on where the heaviest snow bands exactly set up. However, this is a situation where widespread totals over a foot of snow are expected.

NH1.com will have updates throughout the storm. We will be evaluating new data throughout the day Monday, so check back often. At 3:30 p.m. we will be live on NH1.com and Facebook to answer your questions about the storm.

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1 week ago

Nor'easter to hit NH with heavy snow and strong winds on Tuesday, Election Day

The storm set to arrive on Tuesday will bring a quick-hitting snow blitz to the Granite State.

Snow will begin during the morning, from south to north. It will quickly become heavy, with whiteouts and potentially thundersnow from late morning through the afternoon.

Much of the state should see between 10 and 16 inches of snow. A bit less is possible in northwestern New Hampshire.

Some higher amounts closer to 20 inches are expected, but it is difficult to say which areas are most favored for the higher totals.

The map below is a first call. Expect some tweaking and more detail to be added over the next 24 hours.

Here are the main points:

  • Snow begins Tuesday morning, between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. in southern New Hampshire and between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. in northern New Hampshire.

  • The snow will quickly become heavy, with the heaviest snow falling from late morning Tuesday through early evening.

  • White conditions and snowfall rates of 2 to 4 inches per hour are possible at the height of the storm, making travel nearly impossible from late morning through late afternoon Tuesday.

  • Strong wind gusts may cause power outages, especially near the seacoast.

  • The snow will become lighter Tuesday night, with lingering snow showers Wednesday morning.

  • There is the risk of minor to moderate coastal flooding at the seacoast.

The storm will impact town elections that set to occur across New Hampshire Tuesday, with the heaviest snow falling from late morning through the afternoon.

Stay with NH1.com for complete storm updates.

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2 weeks ago

Winter storm watch issued for NH; several inches of snow possible Tuesday into Wednesday

The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm watch for all of New Hampshire, from Tuesday morning through Wednesday evening.

A strong storm will track up the northeast coast on Tuesday, spreading heavy snow into New Hampshire. There is still a relatively high degree of uncertainty on the exact track of the storm. Slight changes in the storm's track can cause large changes in the amount of snow that will fall.

At this time, it is clear the potential is there for six inches or more of snow across the entire state.

MORE: Snowstorm next week may be a big one for NH after record weekend cold

Right now, it appears snow would begin Tuesday morning in southern New Hampshire and Tuesday afternoon in northern New Hampshire, with the heaviest snow later Tuesday into Tuesday night. Snow likely ends on Wednesday morning.

However, it is still to soon to exactly determine the storm's timing and impact.

We expect to post our first snowfall forecast map on Sunday, once the storm's track becomes more certain.

Stay with NH1.com for updates over the next few days.

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2 weeks ago

Snowstorm next week may be a big one for NH after record weekend cold

Nearly a foot of snow falls on average in the month of March, and very little has fallen so far this year.

That is likely to change next week. After near record cold temperatures this weekend, a storm is expected to develop along the east coast. If everything comes together, this may be a "big one" for New England.

Odds are starting to favor a direct hit for New England. When forecasting New England snowstorms, we look for a classic storm to pass near or to the left of the 40N/70W "benchmark", the red dot on the map below. Friday's computer models suggest that kind of a track is more likely.

RECORD COLD THIS WEEKEND

Very cold air this weekend will set the stage for this storm. Highs on Saturday will only be in the teens. If Concord fails to hit 18 degrees on Saturday, it will be the coldest March 11 on record.

Temperatures Saturday night and Sunday night will fall into the single digits below and above zero, depending on where you live. Monday will be a dry day with sunshine and afternoon high temperatures in the upper 20s to low 30s.

EARLY LOOK AT THE TIMING

Clouds will start to increase Monday night. Based on the current timing, snow should begin Tuesday morning in southern New Hampshire and Tuesday afternoon in northern New Hampshire.

The storm will be strengthening offshore. The heaviest snow and strongest wind will likely be late Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. There is a slight chance some rain mixes in with the snow on the Seacoast, but that would be after several inches of snow, and dependent on the storm track.

Some snow may linger into Wednesday morning, but most of the accumulation should be over by then. A gusty wind and colder air can be expected on the back side of the storm.

POTENTIAL SNOW TOTALS

The storm isn't set to begin until Tuesday, so it's far too early for a map with specific numbers.

The ceiling is "high" with this storm, meaning if everything comes together correctly, a foot or more of snow may fall.

Friday's computer models suggest the storm will take a track similar to scenario 1 or scenario 2, outlined in this post. Either track would bring part of New Hampshire a foot or more of snow.

What we can do is start to lay out the potential. Below is a look at the probability for a particular amount of snow in Manchester, based on an average of several different runs of the European computer model.

For a storm that is still four or five days away, probabilities of 70 percent or greater for up to 6 inches of snow are impressive. Almost as impressive is a 40 percent chance of a foot or more of snow. The maps even show a 10 percent chance for up to 2 feet.

The exact track will ultimately determine the final totals. The probabilities above are based on a track closer to "number 2," which would mean lesser amounts in northern New Hampshire and higher amounts in southern and eastern New Hampshire.

Check back for forecast updates this weekend on NH1.com.

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2 weeks ago

3 things to know about this weekend's cold, next week's potential snowstorm

It's going to be another bitterly cold weekend. We may be approaching the middle of March, but winter is far from over. If everything comes together, the potential exists for a large winter storm or nor'easter next week.

Here are three things you should take away from our 7-day forecast:

FRIDAY NIGHT SNOW SQUALLS

A weak system will mostly miss us to the south on Friday. A few flurries or snow showers may move through far southern New Hampshire during the day. Steadier snow will move through Connecticut, Rhode Island, and southeastern Massachusetts, with many areas seeing at least a few inches.

More widespread snow showers and squalls are likely Friday evening, between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m., as an arctic front moves into New Hampshire. Much like last Friday night, these squalls will be hit or miss.

Lasting 15 to 30 minutes, snow squalls very quickly cover the ground and roadways with heavy snow, rapidly reducing visibility. Strong wind gusts can accompany these squalls, making for very brief whiteout conditions. This can create a dangerous situation for drivers, with roads going from dry to covered with snow in a matter of minutes.

BITTER COLD, SUB-ZERO WIND CHILLS SATURDAY

This Saturday will be almost a carbon copy of last Saturday.

A northwesterly wind will gust to 40 mph, transporting arctic air into the state. High temperatures will mostly be in the teens. However, wind chills will be near or below zero for most of the day. In the northern mountains, dangerous wind chills of 20 to 30 degrees below zero are expected. Some wind holds are possible at ski lifts.

Saturday night temperatures will fall into the single digits in southern New Hampshire and below zero in northern areas. Sunday will bring sunshine, but there will be a noticeable wind at times. High temperatures will only be in the lower to middle 20s on Sunday.

BIG STORM POTENTIAL TUESDAY

This cold air will be in place as a much larger storm starts to develop off the east coast on Tuesday. We are confident a storm will develop. However, it is still five days away from forming, so the details are far from certain.

The potential exists for a large coastal storm or nor'easter to form. Right now, the timing appears to be Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday night. The amount of snow will depend on the storm's exact track, but the odds for 6 inches or more of snow appear to be better than 50-50 right now.

Be sure to follow our updates on NH1.com throughout the weekend.

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2 weeks ago

NH1 First Alert Weather: Snow chances, sub-zero wind chills all in NH's forecast

We're approaching the middle of March, but it will feel more like the middle of January over the next week. There are two chances for snow in the next seven days.

A weak system will miss us to the south on Friday, but it will spread more clouds into the Granite State. A few flurries or snow showers may move through far southern New Hampshire during the day on Friday. Steadier snow will move through Connecticut, Rhode Island, and southeastern Massachusetts, with many areas seeing at least a few inches.

More widespread snow showers and squalls are likely Friday evening, between 4 p.m. and 9 p.m., as an arctic front moves into New Hampshire. Much like last Friday night, these squalls will be hit or miss. They can quickly lower the visibility and drop a coating of snow in a matter of minutes.

The weekend will be bitterly cold, with temperatures in the single digits both mornings. Saturday's highs will only be in the teens. Northwesterly wind gusts of 30 to 40 mph will cause wind chills below zero for much of the day.

A larger coastal storm is possible Tuesday. Its exact track and intensity are still in question, but it has the potential to be sizable.

Forecast details:

THURSDAY NIGHT - Clouds increase, with a few flurries possible in southern New Hampshire toward dawn. Lows will be in the teens north to lower 20s south.

FRIDAY - Mostly cloudy. Snow showers are possible in southern New Hampshire during the day; the steadiest snow will miss New Hampshire to the south, moving through Connecticut, Rhode Island, and southeast Massachusetts. More widespread squalls are possible during the evening as an arctic front moves in. These squalls will briefly lower the visibility and cause scattered accumulations of a coating to an inch. Highs will be in the mid 30s.

FRIDAY NIGHT - Evening snow squalls, then cold and windy. Temperatures drop into the single digits with wind chills well below zero by morning.

SATURDAY - Partly to mostly cloudy. Windy and bitterly cold! Wind chills will be below zero most of the day. High temperatures will only be in the teens.

SUNDAY - Sunny, blustery and still cold. Highs in the low to mid 20s, feeling colder with a gusty wind.

MONDAY - Sunny and still cold. Some clouds are possible during the afternoon. Highs in the low 30s.

TUESDAY - Watching a potential coastal storm. The exact track and intensity will determine who sees what, but if it comes close enough, a high-impact snowfall is possible.

WEDNESDAY - Clearing and blustery as the storm departs. Highs in the lower 30s.

THURSDAY - Mostly sunny. Highs in the upper 30s.

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2 weeks ago

Storm track is close to NH later this week; here's a look at our snow chances

Cold air is returning to the Granite State later this week, and social media is abuzz about the potential for additional snowfall.

Right now, there is nothing to get too excited about if you are looking for snow.

However, with bitter cold air in place and a storm track nearby this weekend, snow in this pattern cannot be ruled out.

There are a couple of days to watch: Friday, Sunday, and next Tuesday.

Of course, being a few to several days out, there can be changes to the forecast between now and then.

Here is an overview of our current expectations:

  • FRIDAY - Clipper system tracks south of New Hampshire, bringing steady snow through Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and potentially southern New England. However, on the leading edge of arctic air set to arrive Friday night, there may be some snow squalls in the Granite State. This set-up is very similar to last Friday's, with an organized system missing us to the south, and scattered snow showers/squalls here.

  • SUNDAY - A larger system will likely develop into an ocean storm. However, with cold air and high pressure firmly entrenched over the northeast, most reliable computer models take this storm well south of New Hampshire, leaving us dry through Monday.

  • TUESDAY - As another injection of cold air attempts to arrive next week, another disturbance approaches next Tuesday. Once again, the storm track will be near or south of New England, so we'll have to keep an eye on this one too.

Stay with NH1 News for updates all week.

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